Just Butterflies

I have updated this post to reflect new material. Several of the new butterflies added have not been seen on my blog before.

I occasionally write a Butterflies of the Woods article for our newsletter here at the Woods in Little River where I live. This has rekindled an old interest in butterflies and I have started taking note of the butterflies here on the Mendocino Coast in Northern California.

This interest first started many years ago while I was living in Southern California. My local Audubon Society (Palos Verdes/South Bay) held an annual butterfly count every July. It was based on the famous Christmas Bird Counts and used the same 15 mile diameter bird count circle. Birding can be slow during the Summer and I guess we just like to count things! We would have teams of counters out in the field and would then report back for a lunch and the tally. The results would be sent to the North American Butterfly Assoication. In 2014 there were 439 butterfly counts in the North America. My old Audubon Society will hold their 36th annual count in July 2016. I’m thinking of maybe asking our local Audubon if there is any interest in having our own count.

Butterflies come in all shapes and sizes. They can be conspicuously bright and beautiful or inconspicuously dull and hard to find. The identification of butterflies can be either very easy or extremely difficult. Like birds and people they will be affected by climate change. Birds and butterflies are interrelated in their migration and life cycles. I will link to several stories and websites at the end of this post. The last picture will be of a butterfly that I haven’t identified yet. Any help would be appreciated.

There are approximately 20,000 species of butterflies in the world with about 575 of these occurring regularly in the lower 48 states of the United States. Wherever you live you can find them.

Some of the following pictures are very good, others are not. This all depends on the cooperation of the butterfly and it’s condition when photographed. Some cooperate and others don’t. These are mostly common butterflies in this area and can be found without much effort and include only a small amount of local habitats.

Some caution has to be used when naming these butterflies because, like birds, their names can change. Splitting and lumping has occurred over time. I’m using the most recent butterfly guide that I could find for this post. It’s the Kaufman Field Guide to Butterflies of North America by Jim P. Brock & Kenn Kaufman (2003). I have added Arthur M. Shapiro’s Field Guide to Butterflies of the San Francisco Bay and Sacramento Valley Regions(2007) to my sources.

These pictures are in no particular order. I will start with the butterfly that is the most common (at least this year) where I live.

MYLITTA CRESCENT

Phyciodes mylitta

Woods in Little River and the Little River Airport

MONARCH

Danaus plexippus

Haul Rd. near Lake Cleone

COMMON BUCKEYE

Junonia coenia

Woods in Little River, the Little River Airport and the Haul Rd. north of Fort Bragg

MARGINED WHITE

Pieris marginalis

Navarro Beach Road, the Haul Rd. at Lake Cleone and Big River Haul Road

PINE WHITE

Neophasia menapia

Little River Airport

CHECKERED WHITE
Pontia protodice
Bluffs above Virgin Creek

COMMON RINGLET

Coenonympba tullia

Little River Airport and many other places

EDITH’S CHECKERSPOT

Eupbydryas editha

Haul Road north of Fort Bragg

ORANGE SULPHUR

Colias eurytheme

Haul Road north of Fort Bragg

WESTERN PINE ELFIN

Callophrys eryphon

Little River Airport

CALIFORNIA SISTER

Adelpha californica

Woods in Little River

CABBAGE WHITE

Pieris rapae

Haul Road north of Fort Bragg

PAINTED LADY

Vanessa cardui

Woods in Little River and Virgin Creek Beach

AMERICAN LADY

Vanessa virginiensis

Woods in Little River

WEST COAST LADY

Vanessa annabella

End of Ward Ave.

RED ADMIRAL

Vanessa atalanta

Boardwalk at Lake Cleone

LORQUIN’S ADMIRAL
Limenitis lorquini
BIG RIVER HAUL ROAD

WESTERN BROWN ELFIN

Callophrys augustinus

Little River Airport

SATYR ANGLEWING/COMMA

Polygonia satyrus

Lake Cleone boardwalk, MacKerricher State Park and Big River Haul Road

RUSTIC ANGLEWING/GREEN COMMA

Polygonia faunus rustious

Navarro Beach Road

WESTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL

Papilio rutulus

Haul Road north of Fort Bragg

ANISE SWALLOWTAIL
Pavilion zelicaon
North Star Nursery
PALE SWALLOWTAIL
Papilio eurymedon
BIG RIVER HAUL ROAD
ECHO BLUE/SPRING AZURE
Celastrina ladon echo
Little River Airport and the Woods
ACMON/LUPINE BLUE

Fort Bragg alley along GP Property

ACMON BLUE
Plebejus acmon
End of Ward Ave. and Virgin Creek Bluffs
COASTAL GREEN HAIRSTREAK

Callophrys viridis

Virgin Creek Beach Dunes

GRAY HAIRSTREAK

Strymon melinus

Navarro Beach Road

MYSTERY BUTTERFLY

Haul Road north of Fort Bragg

That’s it for now. Let me know if there are any mistakes.

Climate Change Affects the Flight Period of Butterflies in Massachusetts.

Endangered butterfly defies climate change with new diet and habitat.

Climate Change May Disrupt Monarch Butterfly Migration

Birds and butterflies lagging behind climate change shift

Light-colored butterflies and dragonflies thriving as European climate warms

Butterflies and Climate Change: Post-Superstorm Reflections

Passion for Butterflies Becomes A Study in Climate Change Impact

Welcome to Art’s Butterfly World Related to the above link.

North American Butterfly Association

Edited with BlogPad Pro

Several Butterfly Species Could Go Extinct by 2050

 

 

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Just Butterflies

  1. Wrap Up 2014 – greenbirdingmendo

  2. Hi Richard,

    I’m catching up on my reading. I’ve really enjoyed your recent posts, including the Palos Verdes Audubon story and now these beautiful butterflies. I can never get a decent shot of a butterfly!

    I think a local butterfly count is a great idea, but I would have no idea what I am looking at, other than the few obvious species I know. Still, we’d better get going. Southern California has a 35 year head start…

    Congratulations on dumping the pump. I smile every time I drive by a gas station in my Leaf. Wait, that’s not true… total disclosure: I still enjoy flipping them off.

    We lost our most recent snowy plover nest due to a combination of high tides and extremely high surf last weekend. Humboldt lost several during the same event. I have to wonder if sea level rise also played a role… Where will the birds nest if we have no safe beach habitat available?

    Well, there you go. Another topic for your blog. Thanks for all the great research and information.

  3. This is a Test – greenbirdingmendo

  4. The Birds of Mendocino County | justbirdsmendo

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